Historical institutional abuse in Northern Ireland: appeal for victims to speak

Historical institutional abuse in Northern Ireland: appeal for victims to speak

A major statutory inquiry into historical institutional abuse in Northern Ireland has issued an appeal for victims and survivors now living in Great Britain, Australia, Canada and the United States to come forward.

Dying man names Child Rapist, USA

Dying man names Child Rapist, USA

Before he died, however, Robbie said he wanted to protect other innocent victims from the depraved monster responsible for his then-imminent death. In a video taken at his deathbed, Robbie named his attacker.

Survivors of Ritualized Abuse Form Coalition with Nobel Peace Prize Nominee to Fight International Child Trafficking Rings

Survivors of Ritualized Abuse Form Coalition with Nobel Peace Prize Nominee to Fight International Child Trafficking Rings

David Shurter blogs about CEOs of four ritual abuse survivor organizations joining forces with Nobel Peace Prize Nominee Kevin Annett…

Nearly 35 million U.S. children have experienced one or more types of childhood trauma

In the CDC’s ACE Study, the ten types of childhood adversity measured were:

 

  • physical, sexual, verbal abuse
  • physical and emotional neglect
  • a parent who’s an alcoholic (or addicted to other drugs) or diagnosed with a mental illness
  • witnessing a mother who experiences abuse
  • losing a parent to abandonment or divorce
  • a family member in jail

Nearly 35 million U.S. children have experienced one or more types of childhood trauma.

 

You Deserve… an End to Rape Culture

reblogging this

Dr. Kathleen Young: Treating Trauma in Tucson

Take Back the NightApril is Sexual Assault Awareness Month. On the University of Arizona campus we intensify our constant efforts to raise awareness of not only sexual violence but of the overall rape culture that supports such violence. Rape culture refers to the manner in which prevalent attitudes, norms, practices, and media condone, normalize, excuse, or encourage sexualized violence. These attitudes often take the form of victim blaming.

Just last week we held our Take Back the Night march and rally. With music, speakers, a resource fair, and an open mike survivor speak out, this was a moving and powerful event. I was so proud of all the survivors who spoke their truth and of the audience that held them with such compassion and support. It was truly an empowering and remarkable evening.

In the midst of this, we encountered a reminder of why we do what we do. A specific example of

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Tor network at heart of Northern Kentucky child porn case

Dreadful to read about this pornography ring

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The Reality of Male Slavery: Human Trafficking

An extract from an excellent blog post http://davidshurter.com/?p=2670

The Dancing Boys of Afghanistan is an excellent documentary.

It disturbs me that many people associate human trafficking and the sex trade just with women, as it extends far beyond that, and is much seedier than most would like to consider. In a previous video I posted entitled “Boys for Sale”, it shows the propensity that many pedophiles have for the flesh of young boys, and how vast this extends, at least in Houston in the 80s. There is also another documentary called “Conspiracy of Silence” which shows the problems that were experienced here in Omaha during the bilking of 40 million dollars from the Franklin Credit Union. When you factor in groups such as NAMBLA (the North American Man Boy Love Association), whose motto is “sex before eight or it is too late”, and pedophile groups like that of “Dreamboard”, which has been found to be in existence decades before the internet, one must wonder why all of this has been allowed to exist openly in the public eye.

I just attended a program on human trafficking in Nebraska, and the key speaker spoke of two films- one a Frontline documentary entitled “The Dancing Boys of Afghanistan”, and another called “The Whisleblower” which depicts the speaker’s experiences coming forward and reporting that American government contractors are heavily involved with the human trafficking trade abroad. The problem that I had with this presentation is that while human trafficking is a huge problem for third world countries, it is also very prevalent and ongoing in the United States as well, and local law officials in the States are about as eager to investigate and prosecute these criminals as Afghanistan is, which is a really sad take on America if you ask me.

Young boys were a focal point in the events that took place here in Omaha, NE- in the center of the United States, here in the 80′s and early 90s, as well as being in Houston- where “Boys for Sale” was filmed. These are just two places in America that this was a problem- and yet over and over it is viewed as an issue for women in third world countries. This HAS TO BE FOR A REASON! Defying logic and what is known about the issues here in the States, depicting this problem as it has been is misleading and one must wonder why our media doesn’t spend more time investigating and reporting the facts of the matter rather than leading society to believe that it is only poor countries that have this problem.

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