Corporate initiative can play a major role in anti-trafficking movement

Global business coalition against human trafficking, reblogging from News on Modern Day Slavery

News on Modern Day Slavery

Convincing policymakers is a constant struggle for most not-for-profit organisation. Years of relationship building and grassroots work are usually required. Not so for the Global business coalition against human trafficking (gBCAT). President Barack Obama spoke about it from the podium of the Clinton Global Initiative soon after the coalition was formed.

Why the ringing endorsement? Partly, because of the seriousness of the issue. Human trafficking is the ugly side of today’s global trade networks. Affecting an estimated 2.5 million people per year, its market value has been put at $32bn (£21bn) – making it the second most lucrative criminal activity after drug running.

The gBCAT is a business-only coalition that counts some of the world’s largest corporations among its founders, including Coca-Cola, ExxonMobil, Ford, Microsoft and ManpowerGroup. Collectively, they pack a serious punch.

“NGOs and governments are very passionate about it [fighting trafficking], but until corporate America gets behind this…

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